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Yesterday, we got to look at a bunch of photos purporting to show the Lumia 1030, the long-rumored follow-up to the Nokia Lumia 1020 from a year and a half ago. The 1020 featured a 41-megapixel camera, and distinguished itself as the smartphone with the most powerful photo-taking capabilities – but a new rumor suggests that the 1030 may still outperform its predecessor.

According to a post on NokiaPowerUser, a tipster claims that the Lumia 1030 will offer up a 50 megapixel camera. The rumors don’t stop there, either: the tipster also apparently says that the 1030 itself will be bigger-bodied than the 1020, and will lack both the mechanical shutter and Xenon flash that were featured on its 2013 ancestor. Instead of the Xenon flash, it’ll have a “4th gen short pulse LED Flash,” though I can’t speak to the benefits of one kind of flash over the other.

It’s a relief to hear that the 1030’s camera will see an improvement – not because 41 megapixels isn’t enough, but because the rest of the specs we heard about yesterday – 2 GB of RAM, 32 GB of internal storage, and a 1080p hi-def display – were just about the same as the specs on the 1020. But that raises another question: how much better is 50 megapixels over 41 megapixels? I mean, more than “9 megapixels better.” Will the difference be noticeable with the naked eye?

A post on GSMArena about the handset says that Microsoft is expected to debut this smartphone – be it the Lumia 1030 or some other name – at the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona from March 2 through March 5 in 2015. Hopefully we’ll find out more about this thing before then, though.

[Sources: NokiaPowerUser, GSMArena]


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