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davisbaumung

What Are All The Tools In Your Tool Box

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You'll have to be a little more specific ... Is the question: What tools do we use for working on our PCs or other electronics?

Other than standard tools I have jeweler's screwdrivers, a home-built meter and a home-built test light.

Soldering iron and THE most important tool, soldering braid (braided copper wires used to remove or soak up excess solder), shrink-tubing, wire ties and whatever you call those plastic things you attach to cabinets (for example) and they give you a place to tie off wires.

Edited by JDoors

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My tool box (a REAL man's toolbox) only has TWO things in it

Duct Tape and WD-40

If it moves and it shouldn't, then use the Duct Tape

If it don't move and it should, use the WD-40

End of story!!!

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My favorite is the "Quick Strip". You lose a little more "innards" than if you do it my hand, but it's quicker and fairly idiot proof.

I've used a similar "automatic" stripping tool before and I really liked using it, but somehow I've never gotten around to purchasing one. I still use a manual stripper or a knife.

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You reminded me of another tool I used to use, a grounded wrist strap. Once PCs came into use I stopped using it and started just staying in contact with the frame (as much as practical). Nowadays at work we don't bother worrying about static disharges at all. For the most part I still use the same practices I am in the habit of using, but I notice other techs, for example, holding chips by their pins. We've never had a chip fail, so ... either we're lucky, or chips are that much more resistant to static.

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^^ Reminds me of a Call for Help episode where a caller asks if he should be worried about ESD. THen they turn the camera to one of the show members who is scratching his head with a PCI card.

Edited by Bubba Bob

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ESD is as likely as being struck by lightning these days. I have a wriststrap when I work on certain things, but I ussually don't use it

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Is this resistance something that crept upon us? Or does anyone remember a particular, "official," mention either in the press or possibly an instruction manual?

Sheesh, chips used to be inserted into carbon/foam blocks, then slipped into conductive envelopes, and only THEN packaged as usual. You were instructed to NEVER touch the pins or allow them to touch anything but the socket they were intended for. Now they even come in bulk, just a big jumble of chips! :o

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I was just snoopin in the computer shop the a few months ago and happened upon a PC tool kit.

It's got 2 philips head screwdrivers, 1 big 1 little.

2 Flat heads, same as philips

torx screw driver (for Compaq's and others)

hexagonal shaped screw driver that fits over CD and HDD screws

a smaller one to fit I/O screws like what you screw your monitor into

Chip puller

Chip pusher

tweasers

a syringe looking thing that that sticks out 3 claw wires for picking up screws you've dropped in the case (very handy)

and a screw tube (a tube to put screws in while you're working on the PC)

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I use the plastic cases 35mm film comes in to store the screws and standoffs

drivers, screw and nut

Multimeter

tape

tweezers, plastic coated

small brushes for cleaning fans and heatsinks. Knock the dust loose then vacuum it up

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well I have a phillips screwdriver, air crompressor for blowing out the dirt, needle nose pliers....never needed anything else.

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well that's what the the guy at the store said it was. I think, i can't really remember.

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Like tools for working on small electrons and like some esidental wireing (learnt in school) stuff like that o ya and some on computers but that would fall under electronics. Is that more clear

Set your goals to actually see the signal, my right hand has been the Hitachi quad trace V-1050

oscilloscope, would be total lost with seeing the wave forms in real time.

Quality soldering ability a must, have done super with a butane probably a current Radio Shack

Changeable tips depending on the project, powerfull enough for 12 guage wire and lite for

small components of a circuit board. 1st entered the market about 1985

The wrist strap grounding has been carried away too far, depending on your atmosphere,

heck haven't found a static charge even from my cat BuckWheat.

If you be working under conditions of static, then common sense to touch the chassies,

to avoid the floating ground....Ouch trying to keep simple.

The multi meter comes next, the prices are so low now, a must have.

How could you venture anywhere without.

So there a brief glimpse into 50 years worth of repair haha

Many more test equipment, that someday depending on your goals,

talk later about freq. counters, etc, should you wish haha

Marsh

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