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Snaxe

Internet And Startup

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Is there something I need to do in order to get the internet to work in Linux? I am using Red Hat 9. It also says GRUB and then a number at the Red Hat dual boot menu.

Also, I don't think Windows is supposed to load faster than Linux, what could be wrong?

System specs:

AMD Athlon XP 2600+

ATI Radeon 9800 Pro

ABIT NF7-s

1 GB RAM

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What type of internet connection are you trying to run?

If you are connected through a router, are you wired, or wireless?

If wireless, what wireless adapter model do you have?

I'm not too sure about the loading time, but I've had 2 different distros of Linux, and both always took longer to boot up than windows.

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Is there something I need to do in order to get the internet to work in Linux? I am using Red Hat 9. It also says GRUB and then a number at the Red Hat dual boot menu.

Also, I don't think Windows is supposed to load faster than Linux, what could be wrong?

System specs:

AMD Athlon XP 2600+

ATI Radeon 9800 Pro

ABIT NF7-s

1 GB RAM

I've always found Linux to take a long time to boot-up, longer than Windows. When you're installing Red Hat it should ask you questions about setting up your network. I found that Red Hat found my Internet connection through my router quite easily. Are you using a modem or NIC to connect with? If you've got a router and NIC just set Red Hat to DHCP and Red Hat will get an assigned IP address from your router.

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Cable, router, wired

I'm using a modem. I don't even know what NIC is.

When Red Hat was installed, it was at a friend of my brother's house and no internet was connected.

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I definitely don't have one of those.

You sure? What connects your machine to the router or the external world?

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Cable, router, wired

I'm using a modem. I don't even know what NIC is.

When Red Hat was installed, it was at a friend of my brother's house and no internet was connected.

If you've got cable and a router then you've got a network interface card (NIC). The NIC will have a cable that comes out of the back of it and plugs into your router which is then plugged into your cable modem. Was this computer connected to your high speed Internet before you installed Red Hat?

Watch when Red Hat boots up and look at the start-up scripts as they scroll by it will show if your network card is detected at start-up. If it says OK beside network card as your computer is starting then you're very close to being on-line.

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I'll go check that.

EDIT:!: I did not see a start up script like what you described. There wasn't any that failed, but there wasn't any that looked like what you described. No this computer was not connected to the internet before Red Hat was installed.

Edited by Snaxe

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I'll go check that.

EDIT:!: I did not see a start up script like what you described. There wasn't any that failed, but there wasn't any that looked like what you described. No this computer was not connected to the internet before Red Hat was installed.

If you're going to connect to your Internet service provider with your cable modem you're going to need to install a network card. I think you should call your ISP and see if they have any special requirements for connecting to their server with Red Hat, get some help from a tech buddy. I've used 3com NICs to successfully connect to my ISP using Red Hat 9. If you go to Red Hat's website they will list network cards that're compatible with red hat. Good luck with this.

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I'll go check that.

EDIT:!: I did not see a start up script like what you described. There wasn't any that failed, but there wasn't any that looked like what you described. No this computer was not connected to the internet before Red Hat was installed.

Assuming you have working NIC, it could be a driver issue. If you can bear with me for a few minutes (er, I guess it would be 'days' based on the last thread :-), try logging into the console or opening up a terminal window and fire off

$ lspci

That should produce a list of all the PCI devices in your system. Looks for either an Ethernet card or some sort of unidentified device.

If lspci doesn't work, try

$ less /proc/pci

You should get a few pages of garbage describing all the PCI devices in your system. Again, look for anything that could be an Ethernet card. If you're lucky it may actually say "Ethernet controller". As a reference, here's the entry for one of my Pro 100s

  Bus  0, device   9, function  0:
   Ethernet controller: Intel Corp. 82557/8/9 [Ethernet Pro 100] (rev 8).
     IRQ 5.
     Master Capable.  Latency=32.  Min Gnt=8.Max Lat=56.
     Non-prefetchable 32 bit memory at 0xe3201000 [0xe3201fff].
     I/O at 0xd000 [0xd03f].
     Non-prefetchable 32 bit memory at 0xe3000000 [0xe30fffff].

You can ignore all this information about the card for the moment. All the matters is that the kernel sees it.

Edit: Forgot that lspci might be there.

Edit: Removed a long expository paragraph about device management that I added in the previous edit. In retrospect, it wasn't worth the bytes.

Edited by jcl

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Thanks for helping him out, jcl, much appreciated:-) I like your signature "Alleged Linux Expert"

I think the allegation is true, man:-)

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I saw something that I missed during the startup scripts that might be related:

Setting network parameters                        [ OK ]

I found the ethernet controller with the

$ less /proc/pci

It said:

Bus  0, device   4, function  0:
 Ethernet Controller: PCI device 10de:0066 (nVidia Corporation) (rev 161).
   IRQ 10.
   Master Capable.   No bursts.  Min Gnt=1.Max Lat=20.
   Non-prefetchable 32 bit memory at 0xe8087000 [0xe80870ff].

Maybe it has something to do with "function 0"?

EDIT:!:

With

$ lspci

it brings up

00:04.0 Ethernet controller: nVidia Corporation nForce2 Ethernet Controller (rev a1)

Edited by Snaxe

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Oh boy. I didn't realize the NF7-s was an nForce2. It probably is a driver problem.

The good news is that there are drivers. The bad news is that your choices are a set of binary drivers from NVIDIA or an experimental driver in the kernel. You best bet would be the binary driver. As a bonus, the NVIDIA driver also includes the drivers for the onboard audio.

First thing to do is to check if there's a packaged version of the driver out there somewhere. Unfortunately I don't have Red Hat so I don't know where to look.

If there isn't a packaged version, or if you just don't feel like looking (understandable), hit NVIDIA's driver page and follow the instructions. NVIDIA seems to produce pretty good installers and good documentation. Be aware that you may need the kernel source installed. The installer will complain if you do and it isn't there.

I have heard reports of NVIDIA's drivers failing with Red Hat kernels. Red Hat 9 may be old enough that that won't be a problem (seems to be Fedora that causes most of the trouble), but I can't guaranty anything.

Also, you'll have to reinstall the drivers every time you upgrade the kernel, so keep the installers handy.

Edited by jcl

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Thanks jcl! I'll try that tomorrow as I am one heck of procrastinator (homework).

EDIT:!:The Next Day: Are there any requirements or anything that I need to do in order to burn a data CD in Windows to be used in Linux? Or does someone know an alternate way for me to get the driver to Linux? I do not have a USB thumb drive

Edited by Snaxe

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I should probably make a post to draw attention to the question...

Are there any requirements or anything that I need to do in order to burn a data CD in Windows to be used in Linux? Or does someone know an alternate way for me to get the driver to Linux? I do not have a USB thumb drive.

EDIT:!: Never mind. Someone told me the answer. No there are not any requirements.

Edited by Snaxe

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just for the record I have always used the Kernel driver for the nvidia network card with no problems (since 2.6) .. but as it seams he is using red hat (9?) and its using probaly a 2.4 kernel the Nvidia nforce drive is probaly the best choice

http://www.nvidia.com/object/linux_nforce_1.0-0283.html

but they must have kernel development installed.... before this will work

also I belive you need to do a

export GCC=gcc3.2

before running..

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