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spirittoo

Maybe It's Not Such A Bad Idea To Learn Linux

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I'm a type of person that doesn't like to be at the mercy of corporations. They are working to take away all our rights in favor of corporate profits. Anytime I can enpower myself to fight them I do. .... but that's another forum.

I don't like what MS is doing and I think it may be a good idea to learn about another OS.

Where do I start with Linux? I heard it isn't very user friendly but I'm not afraid to learn new computer stuff.

Point me in the right direction and give me your feedback on Linux.

Thank you for your time. :thumbsup:

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the best way to learn is to jump right in. I would reccomend downloading ubuntu, it is good for beginners. Linux is differnet then windows, but can do just about anything windows can, but not run programs that were desighned to run on winodows.

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the best way to learn is to jump right in. I would reccomend downloading ubuntu, it is good for beginners. Linux is differnet then windows, but can do just about anything windows can, but not run programs that were desighned to run on winodows.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

What is "ubuntu'? ..... so that means MS word won't work? Does Linux use something with the same format.

I am writing a book and the publishers want's MS word.

Thank you for your time. :mellow:

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ubuntu is a name of a linux distibution.

http://www.ubuntulinux.org/

ms word will not run on linux. Open office might be a good alternative it can open and save in .doc format. This program has both a windows and linux port. You could try it without even installing linux

http://www.openoffice.org/

Edited by shanenin

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I'm at work right now and using Unbuntu. I do almost all my work with this computer and have never had a problem opening .doc files or other people reading mine. I would check with a publisher about using open office. Also you may need to keep a windows box around just for your book.

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the best way to learn is to jump right in. I would reccomend downloading ubuntu, it is good for beginners. Linux is differnet then windows, but can do just about anything windows can, but not run programs that were desighned to run on winodows.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

What is "ubuntu'? ..... so that means MS word won't work? Does Linux use something with the same format.

I am writing a book and the publishers want's MS word.

Thank you for your time. :mellow:

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

OpenOffice can save in M$word format

There are program to allow the use of some window based apps. I use Xandro Desktop 3.0 Deluxe (debian base Linux Distro) it came with Crossover Office

So I can install Many adobe (photoshop etc., etc.) Macromedia, and M$ Office

But I have found no reason to do so (except Photoshop and Illustrator).

OpenOffice work just as good as M$ office.

Useless info: Adobe is in the process (if they have not already) of buying the rights to Macromedia's web design tools (dreamweaver, flash, and fireworks)

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I'm at work right now and using Unbuntu. I do almost all my work with this computer and have never had a problem opening .doc files or other people reading mine. I would check with a publisher about using open office. Also you may need to keep a windows box around just for your book.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

How do you like it? What do you like about it and what don't you like about it?

Windows box?

OpenOffice can save in M$word format

There are program to allow the use of some window based apps. I use Xandro Desktop 3.0 Deluxe (debian base Linux Distro) it came with Crossover Office

So I can install Many adobe (photoshop etc., etc.) Macromedia, and M$ Office

But I have found no reason to do so (except Photoshop and Illustrator).

OpenOffice work just as good as M$ office.

Useless info: Adobe is in the process (if they have not already) of buying the rights to Macromedia's web design tools (dreamweaver, flash, and fireworks)

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

A friend of mine does all the book editing .... I know nothing about writing ..... he has word .... can he still use word if I use OpenOffice?

I bet OO is just as good as MSO.

Are you using a different OS other than MS? If so how do you like it and what do you like about it?

Thank you for your time. :mellow:

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linux

It's good to know what "Linux" is before you jump in. Wikipedia gives an excelent overview.

Pay particular attention to the bits on "distributions" and "desktop environments".

If you want, you could try OpenOffice.org on Windows, along with a number of other applications that you may end up using on GNU/Linux. Making a "pre-switch" may help you, and even if you decide GNU/Linux isn't for you, you may end up liking some of the software you try as a result.

Besides OOo some popular cross platform FOSS includes

Firefox (Web Browser)

Thunderbird (Email/Usenet/RSS/Atom)

The GIMP (Raster Image editor, like Adobe Photoshop)

Inkscape (Vector Image editor, like Corel DRAW! or Adobe Illustrator)

Gaim (Multiprotocol IMP/Chat client)

Abiword (Lightweight Word Processor)

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linux

It's good to know what "Linux" is before you jump in.  Wikipedia gives an excelent overview.

Pay particular attention to the bits on "distributions" and "desktop environments".

If you want, you could try OpenOffice.org on Windows, along with a number of other applications that you may end up using on GNU/Linux.  Making a "pre-switch" may help you, and even if you decide GNU/Linux isn't for you, you may end up liking some of the software you try as a result.

Besides OOo some popular cross platform FOSS includes

Firefox (Web Browser)

Thunderbird (Email/Usenet/RSS/Atom)

The GIMP (Raster Image editor, like Adobe Photoshop)

Inkscape (Vector Image editor, like Corel DRAW! or Adobe Illustrator)

Gaim (Multiprotocol IMP/Chat client)

Abiword (Lightweight Word Processor)

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Thanks ..... will it give me an idea of what programs work with it. Can I play games with it?

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linux

It's good to know what "Linux" is before you jump in.  Wikipedia gives an excelent overview.

Pay particular attention to the bits on "distributions" and "desktop environments".

If you want, you could try OpenOffice.org on Windows, along with a number of other applications that you may end up using on GNU/Linux.  Making a "pre-switch" may help you, and even if you decide GNU/Linux isn't for you, you may end up liking some of the software you try as a result.

Besides OOo some popular cross platform FOSS includes

Firefox (Web Browser)

Thunderbird (Email/Usenet/RSS/Atom)

The GIMP (Raster Image editor, like Adobe Photoshop)

Inkscape (Vector Image editor, like Corel DRAW! or Adobe Illustrator)

Gaim (Multiprotocol IMP/Chat client)

Abiword (Lightweight Word Processor)

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Thanks ..... will it give me an idea of what programs work with it. Can I play games with it?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

If there are linux versions of those games. Usually not.

Linux isn't a free Windows clone. You shouldn't go in expecting to run the same apps you always have, nor should you expect it to act the same way Windows did. IMO, it's best to study up on your own until you no longer need to ask these sorts of questions. By then, you should have sufficient knowledge and google searching skill to really start using Linux.

Edited by TheLetterK

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I'm at work right now and using Unbuntu. I do almost all my work with this computer and have never had a problem opening .doc files or other people reading mine. I would check with a publisher about using open office. Also you may need to keep a windows box around just for your book.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

How do you like it? What do you like about it and what don't you like about it?

Windows box?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Like I said I use it at work, and for work I want something super stable, simple to use, and don't want to always worry about viruses and spyware. Linux does all this for me.

What I don't like is although you can install and do most anything right away. You still have to spend a few weeks figuring out how to install plugins and many apps. I used a version of Linux called Ark Linux that is still in Beta that was incredibility simple but the new version won't install for me. So I tried Ububtu and although not as user frindly anyone with a 6th grade education and some spare time can be happy with it.

I would also like to say I'm a Mac user 90% of the time so I did get use to having everything just work right with little user input.

Windows Box = computer running windows

Edited by isteve

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Like I said I use it at work, and for work I want something super stable, simple to use, and don't want to always worry about viruses and spyware. Linux does all this for me.

What I don't like is although you can install and do most anything right away. You still have to spend a few weeks figuring out how to install plugins and many apps. I used a version of Linux called Ark Linux that is still in Beta that was incredibility simple but the new version won't install for me. So I tried Ububtu and although not as user frindly anyone with a 6th grade education and some spare time can be happy with it.

I would also like to say I'm a Mac user 90% of the time so I did get use to having everything just work right with little user input.

Windows Box = computer running windows

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Installing plugins would be a big deal for me ... I use a lot of them. Is Linux working on a way to make them easier to install?

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Like I said I use it at work, and for work I want something super stable, simple to use, and don't want to always worry about viruses and spyware. Linux does all this for me.

What I don't like is although you can install and do most anything right away. You still have to spend a few weeks figuring out how to install plugins and many apps. I used a version of Linux called Ark Linux that is still in Beta that was incredibility simple but the new version won't install for me. So I tried Ububtu and although not as user frindly anyone with a 6th grade education and some spare time can be happy with it.

I would also like to say I'm a Mac user 90% of the time so I did get use to having everything just work right with little user input.

Windows Box = computer running windows

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Installing plugins would be a big deal for me ... I use a lot of them. Is Linux working on a way to make them easier to install?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

"Linux"? There is no central team in charge of all GNU/Linux development. Though I've never really had a problem installing plugins. apt-get install <plugin package> on Debian.

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