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theredog

One W7 disc w/32bit and 64bit ?

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I have a Windows disc I bought that has the 32 bit and 64 bit OS on it. I have the 32 bit loaded on a HDD and was wondering if I can load and register the 64 bit on another hard drive or does registering one, cancel the other?

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Bummer.

What happens if I try and load the 64 bit on to a HDD , then register?

Will Microsoft inform me that the reg key is already being used and I need to decide which one to keep?

Already spent way too much money on this build.

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Bummer.

What happens if I try and load the 64 bit on to a HDD , then register?

Will Microsoft inform me that the reg key is already being used and I need to decide which one to keep?

Already spent way too much money on this build.

Never done it before, but I would think if you install the 64 Bit version the Key code will be asked for and the same key should work but you will never be able to do any updates for it. Why not just install the 64 Bit instead? Maybe you can install it on another partition on that same PC.

Like I said not sure but someone will know.

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The key codes for 32bit are usually different from a 64bit code.

Windows 7 usually installs the type automaticlly based on the which key is used.

If you do have a multi-bit key (which they have). It will lock in under the one you activated with.

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Got this build fired up for the first time today w/ 64 bit W7 Pro.

I partitioned and formatted an OCZ 120Gb SSD.

I was wondering why the HDD LED light on the case stays lit and I was wondering if defraging an SSD is uneccessary?

Is there a way to make mouse commands one click in W7?

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Didn't you get a response to at least one of those questions on the G4 Tech Support forum?

Single-click can be activated within Windows Explorer > Tools > Folder Options.

No, you should not defragment SSDs. First of all, they don't need to be defragmented because access time remains the same (i.e. pretty low) no matter where data is placed on NAND memory.

Secondly, you shouldn't defragment because you are countering the drive's built-in wear distribution. Since SSDs have a limited number of write cycles before they reach the end of their lives, they are designed to intentionally "fragment" data so that all chips get even wearing. By doing this, you don't get chunks of memory failing at different points in time; instead, overall failure is delayed because "stress" is shared by all chips. That's just my interpretation of what I have learned about SSDs. There is no negative performance impact to be concerned about with this intentional "fragmentation" because, as I said before, there is hardly any delay in access time anyway.

You should therefore realize that the process of defragmentation involves moving/writing data so this, in itself, contributes negatively to the life of the SSD.

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