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JDoors

That Darned New Computer

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Kind of a blog post, but ...

So, I hook everything up and it runs fine: Dell Inspiron 530, Vista Home Premium 64bit (see below), Intel Core2Duo 2.80 Ghz, 6GB RAM, 750 GB drive, 22inch monitor (my old one was OK, but wasn't widescreen and what-the-hey, package deal and all ...), an all-in-one printer (my old printer was OK, but I was concerned about compatibility AND I was happy to get rid of HP because of the ridiculous cost of consumables, plus my scanner may or may not have worked with 64bit, etc., so I just got something I knew would work, plus that packaged deal and all ...).

I actually didn't want the 64bit OS 'cause I know there are compatibility problems (eg., No more Netflix Instant Watch movies for me, etc.), but every acceptable system I found came with a 64bit OS.

I had asked in the PC Help Forum what settings I should immediately change and the site I was directed to didn't really have exactly what I was looking for (how to configure the system to boot to a non-admin account, how to turn on display of file extensions, any safety or security issues or settings, etc.), though the site had tons of info (maybe it had what I wanted, but buried in the enormous pile of stuff they had). Most of the stuff I was looking for I either figured out or will eventually (I PREFER, for example, to have file extensions displayed, but it's not a high priority).

I've spent the last day or so investigating everything just so I know what I'm dealing with (remember, I came from Windows 98SE!); added some "gadgets," customized a thing or three, learned where everything was, learned how to do things the 20th Century way (yes, I'm aware it's now the 21st Century). :)

Now -- The Important Thing. Why I bought the computer. The old one died and obtaining a replacement Power Supply was not in the cards (at least, not on my required timetable -- besides, no Internet for me so even if I could wait, that wasn't an option). My finances! Quicken runs me (like in Soviet Russia!). Now, how to transfer my data files over with the data files residing on a dead computer. Install the old drive in the new computer? Nope. Old drive=IDE, New drives=SATA. To install the drive requires a conversion kit (which isn't available locally, and I have no Internet, and there's that durned timetable anyway).

Bingo! My nephew had given me a USB drive in an enclosure, but the drive itself has long since died. I dug it out of storage, put my old IDE drive in there, plugged everything in and -- Voila! My new computer had access to everything on that drive. I moved all the files over.

Done? Nope (You didn't really think it would be that easy, did you?). I needed to install Quicken to USE those data files. I dig out the install disk (Quicken 2001 Deluxe -- Don't laugh, it's one of the few things I have from THIS CENTURY) and ... Not compatible. Can't install it at all. So I went to Quicken and bought a new copy. downloaded it, installed it, ran it, it pretty much automatically found my old files, converted them, and I'm ready to pay my bills on Monday.

Yippee?

Edited by JDoors

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I have so many computers and OS's laying around that I usually don't have any problems. I got stuff compatible with everything just about. I usually don't have any compatibility issues with 64-bit Vista since it has an x86 emulation mode. Heck any non-64-bit programs install into a separate folder from 64-bit programs (Program Files (x86) instead of the regular Program Files). The only problems I've ever had is the original Forgotten Hope mod for Battlefield 1942 wouldn't work (strangely enough BF1942 itself played fine) and the Half-Life: Opposing Force expansion worked up until one point in the game and wouldn't go past (Neither Half-Life nor the Blue Shift expansion had problems though). I even have some ancient games I've tried from Windows 98 days that still work.

Edited by Honda_Boy

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Welcome to Vista! How do you like it? Not quite as bad as people make it out to be, eh?

Most of the stuff I was looking for I either figured out or will eventually (I PREFER, for example, to have file extensions displayed, but it's not a high priority).

Did you find how to do this?

1. Open a folder or open explorer

2. Click the Layout button (to the left of the Views button)

3. Click Folder Options

4. Click the View tab

5. Uncheck Hide extensions for known file types

6. Click OK

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Welcome to Vista! How do you like it? Not quite as bad as people make it out to be, eh?

...

1. Open a folder or open explorer

2. Click the Layout button (to the left of the Views button)

3. Click Folder Options

4. Click the View tab

5. Uncheck Hide extensions for known file types

6. Click OK

I like Vista. I ALWAYS thought the Vista hatred was PATHETIC (sorry 'bout the bluntness if you hate Vista). Everything I heard was the same ol' same ol' complaints about upgrading, "Wah, I gotta get new drivers! Wah, such-and-such a program won't run any more!", blown to RIDICULOUS proportions. For me, the "Please Microsoft, can I PLEASE use this OS I paid for?" issue, which is the main reason I never upgraded from 98SE, was a non-issue. It was automatic and, if it even occured at all, I didn't notice it (of course, I don't have Genuine Advantage enabled ... yet ... so we'll see). The 64-bit issue HAS caused problems (MY OLD DAILY PLANNER! I'm LOST without it!), but more and more stuff is being designed for it so I'll just be patient.

Your list for turning on viewing extensions helped me find that setting, but it wasn't accurate for me, it was more like:

1. Open a folder or open Explorer (I used Explorer).

2. Click the Organize button.

3. Select the Folder and Search menu item (BELOW the Layout menu item).

4. Select the View tab in the Folder Options dialog box.

5. Uncheck the box for Hide Extensions For Known File Types.

6. Click the OK button.

I fixed the "Can't view Netflix Instant Watch Movies" issue too! Seems Windows Media Center CAN install Silverlight -- So for the first time I watched a 'movie' instantly! (Yes' 90215 Live concert.) Couldn't do that with 98SE, that's f'r sho.

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That reminds me that I need to install K-Lite codec pack to be sure on the one I am setting up.

Yeah I wish Microsoft would just keep things in the same place so you can find them and change them. One of the first things I do is change everything to classic view and disable themes so I can find things and change the settings.

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That reminds me that I need to install K-Lite codec pack to be sure on the one I am setting up.

Yeah I wish Microsoft would just keep things in the same place so you can find them and change them. One of the first things I do is change everything to classic view and disable themes so I can find things and change the settings.

Give the Combined Community Codec Pack a shot and see if you like it better than K-Lite. When deciding between the two, I picked CCCP because multiple anime sites suggested it over K-Lite.

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http://www.free-codecs.com/download/K_lite_codec_pack.htm

http://www.cccp-project.net/

http://www.free-codecs.com/download/Combin..._Codec_Pack.htm

I do not watch anime and neither does the person whos computer I was setting up.

Mainly wanted to install something so I did not get a call down the line that they couldn't watch divX or DVD or something basic and normal like that.

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As far as I know, CCCP and K-Lite are essentially the same software. The installers, default settings, and whatnot are different but not enough to really matter.

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most people who I talked to said that the CCCP usually handled some stuff a little better. And Pete, anime has nothing to do with it. CCCP is codec pack that can play just about anything and comes with 2 good players on top of it. It's great particularly if you are an watcher of .mkv or .mp4 files.

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Nah, ya don't need one. Just if you have some kind of issues playing back a certain format. Like I watch H.264 .mkv's and .mp4's so I need a codec pack.

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If I haven't had any trouble running any media (yet), I don't need a codec pack?

The advantage of a codec pack is that one player can generally play everything; rather than having to install a DVD player, a DivX player, a quicktime player , a real media player... etc. It lets whichever player you prefer (even WMP) play most formats without installing all those other programs.

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Yeah that's right but I still wind up using multiple players just due to my preferences :P I like Winamp for audio, Zoom for video, and VLC for DVD's.

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The advantage of a codec pack is that one player can generally play everything; rather than having to install a DVD player, a DivX player, a quicktime player , a real media player... etc. It lets whichever player you prefer (even WMP) play most formats without installing all those other programs.

I'm skittish on using aftermarket players, they've rarely worked to my satisfaction, but then, I was trying to use them in Windows 98, so ... that's probably not an issue any more. :blush:

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