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Honda_Boy

Just How Hard Is Changing A Laptop Lcd?

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I'm gonna order a new LCD to replace the broken one on my Compaq Presario C500 (C551NR) but I've never replaced an LCD on a laptop before (I've only ever replaced thermal paste in a laptop). On top of that it's just the screen and not the casing which means I'm going to have to open the screen casing up. Is there anything I need to be careful of and the other screen is literally broken as in something hit it and cracked it or rather shattered it. Should I be worried about any leaks or anything when I remove the casing? As it sits, there is no leaking or anything, just a screen showing rainbow colors in one spot and a big bright white spot, then just a tiny bit still barely functional in the corner.

Thanks for any help!

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Hi Honda_Boy:

Here are 2 links on how to replace an LCD on a laptop. See if any of these are any help.

LCD's for Less

Screentek

I've never replaced one, so can't help you from personal experience. Pictures look informative. Click on pictures to enlarge. See what you think.

Barb

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I watched an in home repair person replace the LCD on my Dell XPS laptop.

She did almost take the entire thing apart, but it didn't look too difficult.

It just takes a bit of confidence to dig that deep into the guts of a machine.

It only took her 20 minutes to take apart, replace the screen, and reassemble the unit.

Just keep track of all the little screws.

And keep things lined up in order.

(An assembly manual, often downloadable, helps too).

As far as I know, there are no "liquid" problems associated with a Liquid Crystal Display (LCD).

The "liquid" part of the term refers to its switching properties, not a noxious chemical.

But (like broken glass) be careful about getting cut on the edges of the broken screen.

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It's really pretty straight forward. Juust take your time and take notes if you need to. Do it on a surface where you won't loose those blasted little screws.

Here's a link for a Dell:

http://support.dell.com/support/edocs/syst...sm_en/index.htm

Same concept, diffent brand, but the pictures are excellent and will give you a good idea

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The proper way of doing it, as shown in the Dell instructions, is to remove the whole panel before splitting the plastic and changing the lcd. This allows you to lay it on a flat surface to work on it.

If you want to cheat, you can change the LCD without removing the panel from the computer. Then you will work on it with the screen in a similar position as you would when viewing it. The main advantage to this is you do not have to disassemble anything on the base of the computer. The main disadvantage is it is tougher to change the LCD when it is in the upright position, it is awkward. With some computer models it is a major ordeal to remove the whole panel and work with it flat. In those cases it is just easier to work with it while still attached to the computer.

Your particular model will come apart very similar to the Dell model in the tutorial. In that case you may want to remove the whole panel and work on it flat.

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Should take about 2-3 hours if you take your time. I have found that having a small amount of petroleum jelly. This when putting everything back the petroleum jelly on the tip of the screw drive will haold the small screws on while you line them into the holes.

Be careful with the ribbon cables, but you know that.

Tools

small phillips head screw driver

small flat tip, to pry the plastics if needed.

note pad, for noting anything special like the black screws are for the plastics and the silver are for the lcd to the hinges (usually)...

Good luck my friend.

Mike

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It can be a hard task, I work for HP and do a few of them each week. The best advice i can give you is to be very careful of the plastics and the ribbon cables. Also it may be worth it for you to pick up a small plastic organizer and label it so you do not loose track of the screws. If you get me the product number, i may be able to get you a copy of the HP install manual that will guide you through the process. If you need anything else let me know.

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My replacement came in and I just got it installed a few hours ago. And boy was it a PAIN IN THE ASS. And on top of it, I had 2 extra screws when I got done. I have no idea where they go. But aside from that it's working perfectly. I guess I'm just gonna throw the old LCD in the junk computer part box and take it to the next Hazardous Waste pick-up.

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A few extra screw are to be expected :-)

Did you remove the whole screen assembly and work on it flat, or did you leave it attached to the base of the computer while you worked on it? Just curious.

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I took the whole friggin laptop apart and when I got done I realized it could have been much easier. All I NEEDED to do was remove the battery, undo all the screws under it, pull the power button panel off, and that's all on the base I needed to do but I took it all apart. And I removed the LCD casing from the base as well. I could have just left it mostly together and made it much easier (and not have any extra screws). It still would have been a PITA but not as much of one.

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and after talking with a friend, I made another realization. I didn't need to even remove the screws to the power button panel.

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Just two screws the first time around ain't that bad. As you do a couple more you start to see the similarities and logic in the construction.

Now scrape together an old laptop to make a digital photo display for the wall.

Mike

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