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imabooger

Password At Startup

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Hello Imabooger,

What you want to do it go to "start---controlpanel---users". In there you should find options either to create a log on or add a password to an existing one. Hope this helps!!

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hi hb1

is correct

ive passworded my grand daughters

compt through the user account

marty

Edited by martymas

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And if after setting a password for your account it still does not ask for it go to start => run and type

control userpasswords2

Hit enter

Put a check by the box

"Users must enter a user name and password to access this computer"

Do not worry about all the strange accounts you see there; they are machine accounts used by windows.

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But if you're REALLY interested in locking down the machine...

-----------

Many BIOS SETUP routines (Phoenix in particular, very common) have a hard drive password option that prevents access at an early level in the boot sequence.

I THINK that just prevents access without altering (as in encrypting) the hard drive.

-----------

And quite often a password can be set (thereafter required) to enter BIOS SETUP as well.

I DON'T recommend this either since finding the RESET pin/jumper or pulling the CMOS battery can be a problem on some systems if the password is lost.

-----------

I've never used nor do I recommend either of these unless you ABSOLUTELY need this level of security.

-------------

Has anyone tried/use these?

Edited by CurlingSteve

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Has anyone tried/use these?

I had a nephew hanging around the house for a while that simply would not listen. It was either that or remove and lock up the power cords

What nobody knew was my Abit board has a BIOS reset switch in the back on the I/O panel

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But if you're REALLY interested in locking down the machine...

-----------

Many BIOS SETUP routines (Phoenix in particular, very common) have a hard drive password option that prevents access at an early level in the boot sequence.

I THINK that just prevents access without altering (as in encrypting) the hard drive.

-----------

And quite often a password can be set (thereafter required) to enter BIOS SETUP as well.

I DON'T recommend this either since finding the RESET pin/jumper or pulling the CMOS battery can be a problem on some systems if the password is lost.

-----------

I've never used nor do I recommend either of these unless you ABSOLUTELY need this level of security.

-------------

Has anyone tried/use these?

the first is to require a password at reboot, this is good to keep people from overriding the boot process with a different boot disk, and can also be used to alert you that your system booted with out your doing(windows update is the main reason)

the second make someone enter a password before they can change hardware , good for CM or locking down ports

all of these are useless on a desktop, if they have access its a simple matter of pulling the case and reseting the bios..

on servers in a enterprise system all of these are used, if they follow good security policy, as you can not just pull off the case on most servers and reset the password. on Sun servers its not a BIOS its a small OS that controls hardware..

it is to slow down people with physical access, from easily getting information or control.

but they would more likely just pull the hard drive..

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