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Pete_C

The Barbeque , Cookout , And Summer Food Thread

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Well today is Cinquo de Mayo (May 5th the celebration of the victory at the battle of Puebla when General Ignacio Zaragoza Seguín - born in Texas- defeated French forces in 1862. Although this only delayed the fall of Mexico City and installation of Maximillian I as Emperor of Mexico by Napoleon III of France, this delay was sufficient to derail the plan to take advantage of the US Civil war to dispute the validity of the Lousianna Purchase by the US and seize the majority of the US west of the Mississippi and return it to French control).

So yesterday we had our Cinquo De Mayo get together and cookout. Wonderful weather for it, and all the stores cooperated by having Cinquo De Mayo Weekend sales (Dr Pepper products six pack of half liters for a dollar, Burger and Oscar Mayer weiners for a dollar a pound, brisket for 77 cents a pound, corn on the cob five for a dollar).

So I got out the grill and roasted corn, grilled burgers and Oscar Mayers etc. But I decided to try a new approach on the brisket this year. I braised it in the oven.

Start with trimming off the fat, then put a double thickness of extra wide aluminum foil big enough to enclose the brisket in a large lasagne pan (we have one of the big 14x16 pans) and place the brisket in it. I used my cajun injector kit to inject it with a marinade of soy sauce, balsamic vinegar, liquid smoke, catsup, brown sugar, spices, garlic oil etc. I poured the balance of the cup of marinade over the top. I sealed the pouch and placed the pan in a 250 degree oven, watching it carefully. As soon as you hear it start to boil (it took almost an hour) lower the temp to between 150 and 175 (fortunately my oven does go down to 150 and maintain it stably as long as I have my pizza stone on the bottom ).

The idea here is that the oil aids fat soluble seasonings in penetrating the meat and the long slow cooking in a moist slightly acidic sealed environment converts connective tissue (collagen and gristle) into gelatin and keeps proteins from drawing up and expelling water. If you keep the temp low then the meat never overcooks either (just like poaching fish in one of those electric skillets) . Leave it at least four hours at 150 F and then take it out , drain the pack (you can boil this down for an excellent glaze and dipping sauce) and let the meat rest a half hour before carving. So tender you can eat it with your tongue , no teeth required; and it was moist and delicious.

Had diced onions, poblano peppers, jalapenos, tomatoes, cilantro, cheese , pickles, kraft barbeque sauce , etc to go with things and tortillas and buns to make for plate and utensil free eating.

We made a "Mexican Pasta Salad" (the only thing really requiring a plate and utensils ) Spiral pasta with black beans, diced onions, cilantro, taco seasoning, diced tomatoes , sour cream (ranch) dressing and lime juice and grated cheddar cheese ( I wanted to add corn too but the OL said no).

Coolers full of ice cold Dr Pepper and Orange Sunkist.

Had the kids and grandkids over and some neighbors and old friends. Kept it all non alcoholic.

Had quite a spread and was on my feet most of the day between prep and cooking but it was lots of fun.

Everyone raved about the brisket and it was the first thing to run out . So I think that will be my approach from now on for cuts of meat like that. I have done round roast that way before and it too comes out unbelievably moist and tender.

Nice thing was that other than an abundance of bread and buns, and a few hot dogs no leftovers.

Memorial day is just around the corner so we will probably have another. weather permitting.

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Sounds wonderful!

Your recipe for the brisket would work equally well with a pork shoulder roast (although I'd try to maintain 200 for pork.) :thumbsup:

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Pete, I like that you know the science behind the cooking (the reason America's Test Kitchen is my favorite cooking show). I've slow cooked ribs in the oven and, wow, that's the way to go for a lot of large cuts. Everything else sounds SO delicious! So far this year I've only had burgers from the grill -- Lookin' forward to more!

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This weeks specials in the stores locally are Turkeys for 49Cents a pound and Beef ribs for 69 cents.

I would go for a turkey, but the OL said that we had one for Easter and that it was to soon to go for another. May just buy one and leave it in the deep freeze.

They regularly have pork shoulders for 49Cents a pound in the "family pack" where you get two or three in a cryovac pack.

Yes, I think I will definitely try more cuts of meat cooked this way.

I agree that poultry and pork should probably be cooked at a higher temp. I guess that means some research to find the recommended temps.

http://ezinearticles.com/?How-to-Braise-Meat&id=526146

( braising temperatures are 145-300 degrees, inexperienced cooks, however, should not cook below 185-200 without proper equipment for temperature control, meat can spoil if improperly cooked on to low a heat, if there is a simmer (small bubbling) going on in the pot you know your temp is not to low)

They have a time chart too; but if you drop the temp at the end so it does not exceed the "perfectly done" temp for the meat in question I bet you could keep it longer.

Well I have an oven (and grill) thermometer as well as standard meat thermometers and of course the thermal probe for my digital multimeter. But I will probably invest in a fancy digital thermometer with probe for cooking only.

Hmm the idea of pork shoulder braised in apple juice really is appealing.

Might just have to do that one for Memorial day and have pulled pork sandwiches.

Maybe coconut milk and lime juice for chicken? At one hour, that sounds like something attainable even on a weekday.

I like the idea of using the cast iron dutch oven. I have a huge Lodge campfire dutch oven; something in the 16 quart range I think, with tripod legs and a reversible lid to cook biscuits on.m But the 300 degree figure just sounds a bit to high, rushing the job and not getting the full benefits of braising. Because most proteins coagulate at 140 degrees , so you have to get them broken down and the collagen converted to gelatin before they reach that temp.

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I had freinds tell me that people in Texas didn't know what pork was.

Said they never saw anything but beef on menus and at cookouts.

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Pete

I was sitting here around 4:00 this morning (I was having trouble in bed breathing because of a sinus infection) As crappy as I felt this morning, reading your post made my mouth water. (it's not the first time reading one of your food posts has done this to me) I think we should have a separate area for recipes like geeks in the kitchen (or something like that) or can we get this thread pinned, just an idea. :D

Pat

Edited by novi

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Pete

I was sitting here around 4:00 this morning (I was having trouble in bed breathing because of a sinus infection) As crappy as I felt this morning, reading your post made my mouth water. (it's not the first time reading one of your food posts has done this to me) I think we should have a separate area for recipes like geeks in the kitchen (or something like that) or can we get this thread pinned, just an idea. :D

Pat

"I think we should have a separate area for recipes like geeks in the kitchen (or something like that) or can we get this thread pinned, just an idea. :D "

I LOVE it!!!!!!!!!! Geeks in the kitchen! I AM ONE! Let's do it!

Here's a few ideas for naming the forum:

"Sys Chef"

"Sys Saucier"

Short Order Sys Admin

Computer Cook

Linux Line Cook

Mac Maitre D'

System Sous Chef

Keep the ideas coming!

Edited by irregularjoe

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Pete:

You made me hungry man *licks chops* Now, I am gonna wanna eat BBQ - I will get to eat pesto for my birthday dinner ;)

Brian

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I had freinds tell me that people in Texas didn't know what pork was.

Said they never saw anything but beef on menus and at cookouts.

Then they have obviously not really paid attention when they were here.

Of course the tendency is to use pork shoulder roast to make tamales; although they tend to stew in simmering water/broth as opposed to braising. Stew the pork (10 cups water for every 3.5 lbs of pork shoulder) with garlic , onion, for 3-5 hours until it is falling off the bone .

Remove the meat from the broth and allow to cool and then shred with forks like pulled pork and chop it up even finer.

Defat the broth and use it mixed with corn flour (masa) (equal parts ) and shortning (1 part shortning for every 8 parts broth) and a half teaspoon baking powder for every cup of masa to make thick creamy paste . Measures vary depending on quality of the broth, masa, and shortening so you have to know what the paste should look like.

Spread the masa paste on a corn husk, layer on pork and add some chili sauce and roll it up. Stack em upright in a steamer and steam for 40 minutes or until firm.

Serve with more chili sauce (or boil down remaining stock and add chili sauce to it)

It is also traditional in a green chili stew with hominy (corn where the outer shell has been dissolved with calcium hydroxide aka lime water, or as they call it here CAL )

On the grill though , probably primarily chops and pork steak (cut from the boston butt . IE a shoulder like a ham has a butt and a shank, only on the shoulder the shank is called a picnic and the butt a boston butt or shoulder roast.

Edited by Pete_C

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Oh man, I haven't had a good tamale in a LONG time. They serve 'em at work once in a while, but they're dry as the desert (they taste fine, but ... gack!).

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Yeah, it could be that the people I know were involved in raising or trucking cattle.

Mom's brother Pete before he passed on used to say his momma in law was the best tamale maker in West Texas.

But he said he was more fun as momma didn't allow the whiskey bottle in the kitchen.

They always pressure cooked like beef round or flank.

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Oh man, I haven't had a good tamale in a LONG time. They serve 'em at work once in a while, but they're dry as the desert (they taste fine, but ... gack!).

I always like to add some creamed corn to the masa , just like I like adding it to cornbread. This helps, but the real key has got to be moist tender gelatinous meat inside. Also , after they are cooked in the steamer, you really need to put them into a lasagne pan or similar and cover them with sauce , either sour cream sauce, tomatillo (green) , or red (chili) sauce to keep them warm and moist just like enchiladas.

Hmm, that does sound good been a while since I made chicken enchiladas with sour cream sauce.

Novi: regarding the allergies and sinus problems I know what you are talking about. I have a big pecan tree outside the front door and I am terribly allergic to pecan pollen. But I would not part with that tree. I get to the point of taking double doses of claritin, real sudaphed, and even taking an extra benadryl at bedtime (and guaffaneisen mucus relief) but the best thing I have found is warm chicken stock (home made) with fresh cut chopped onions on top.

Yeah, Geeks in the Kitchen sounds like a keeper./

Edited by Pete_C

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Went and sprung the old man from the home for mommy day.

Rib Eye steaks on sale at the Kroger.

Just a little garlic powder and threw some dry hickory chips on top of the lava rocks in a gas grill for smoke and charring.

We like ours burnt rare.

Fresh local asparagus - just nuked it for 4 min in a covered dish /w a little water, then drained it and added a little melted butter.

Brother brought about 2lbs of morel mushrooms they found yesterday- about $120 dollars worth if bought retail- breaded in flour/salt/pepper and pan fried.

A bowl of au graten potatos and momma's cole slaw.

Walnut brownies ala mode with peppermint stick ice cream for desert.

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... Brother brought about 2lbs of morel mushrooms they found yesterday- about $120 dollars worth if bought retail- breaded in flour/salt/pepper and pan fried. ...

OK. This. Must. Stop. ;)

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Went and sprung the old man from the home for mommy day.

Rib Eye steaks on sale at the Kroger.

Just a little garlic powder and threw some dry hickory chips on top of the lava rocks in a gas grill for smoke and charring.

We like ours burnt rare.

Fresh local asparagus - just nuked it for 4 min in a covered dish /w a little water, then drained it and added a little melted butter.

Brother brought about 2lbs of morel mushrooms they found yesterday- about $120 dollars worth if bought retail- breaded in flour/salt/pepper and pan fried.

A bowl of au graten potatos and momma's cole slaw.

Walnut brownies ala mode with peppermint stick ice cream for desert.

Well I definitely cannot top that for morel mushrooms; I have a favorite chinese market which selles oyster mushrooms , king mushroooms, Enoki, shitaki and a couple others all for $1.99 a pound. I still haven't figured how they do it, but I go there for the mushrooms , fresh veggies , tofu and sometimes seafood.

I have a Middle Eastern market I visit for the spices , and every once in a while take advantage of their price on ribeye. They sell HALAL (Islamic version of Kosher) beef, and for some reason no one likes ribeyes so they sell them , on the bone for $2.49 a pound. Nice and thick. I prefer to char the outside on a grill or grill pan or under broiler and then finish them in the oven at 300 until they reach "rare" by the digital thermometer and let them rest for five minutes by which time the heat in the bone has brought them to a perfect medium rare. On the grill this means that you have to finish on the indirect heat side.

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Yeah, it's totally strange that something you can find wondering around in the woods sells for 59.95 a pound.

But people go totally bonkers over them. shroom hunters

To me, a perfect steak has grill marks and a nice brownish color /w the fat a little crisp and blackened.

A 1" steak that has browned about a 1/8-1/4" in from both sides and still pink in the middle is perfect.

As above and a 5 minute rest on the way to the table is just right to me.

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Bought some eggplant (hey they had them two for a dollar, not two pounds, two eggplants and they are nice quality) and they had zucchini for 69 cents a pound. Trying to decide if I want to smoke them (and some tomatoes and sweet onions ) and make a smoked veggie pasta salad or something else.

Received a flyer advertising 4oz filets for a dollar. Gotta check em out; probably very low grade for that price; but then Tom Thumb is advertising Tbones, Ribeyes, and NY strips (all bone in ) for $3.99 a pound. so , maybe it is just competition at long last.

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Memorial Day is hotdogs traditionally (and they have Oscar Meyers on for 99 cents a pound locally ) so let me toss this one out.

My OL loves Prices Pimento Cheese spread , and recently I caught it on sale for $3.50 for a three pound tub so I bought three.

While she loves it on bread, I find that rather lacking; but something told me to try it on a hot dog.

WOW, it is great, but it seems to be missing something.

So far, I tried catsup (okay but still not what is missing), I tried yellow mustard (better than catsup but not what it needs, maybe hot chinese mustard next)

Any suggestions?

I am contemplating Chili (Texas style meat no beans and Vegetarian chili with beans ), Diced Olives ,Pickle relish , and Onions as possible additions.

Any Pimento Cheese fiends out there with a suggestion as to what really compliments it best?

I think I will use google and do some research and testing. I just googled hot dog pimento cheese and it seems to be a popular combination.

http://www.google.com/search?client=opera&...-8&oe=utf-8

Hmm roasted corn (Sliced off the cob of course) and bacon bits is really good with pimento cheese on a hot dog. Still not quite there.

I wish I could get the OL interested in trying different combinations; or just have a tasting party , but I know the kids and grandkids would not be willing to experiment. If I have something really good, they will go for it once one tries it and says it is good.

Edited by Pete_C

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OK. Here's yesterdays menu:

I made a wet mop BBQ suauce out of ketchup, Worcestershire, molasses, cider vinegar, tabasco, honey, onion powder, garlic, and a littlle liquid smoke.

I quartered and skinned a 5 pound chicken and marinated it in some of the BBQ sauce for about two hours.

Next item was Italian Baked beans. Cannellini beans, pancetta, tomato sauce, dark beer, dijon mustard, sauteed onion and garlic. Baked at 400 for 45 minutes. If you want the recipe, let me know.

Finally some ears of sweet corn sprayed with olive oil and sprinkled with tabasco wrapped in foil baked on the top rack of the grill for about 45 minutes (indirect heat).

I grilled the chicken on high heat for about eight minutes per side and then finished them on the top rack of the grill on low heat (about 375) for 35 minutes.

Very good!

Edited by irregularjoe

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Went to the Niece & Nephew's for Memorial Day. She went from being a cooking neophyte to a gourmet cook in just a few years, amazing.

Menu (I can't really begin to describe how fantastic it tasted):

Appetizers: finger sandwiches, veggies & dip

Sliced, perfectly grilled steak, grilled onions w/ a touch of some kinda mayo-based sauce on hoagie rolls (hot, juicy, savory ... whoa)

Grilled corn

Cucumber salad

Dessert: home-made Key lime pie

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OK. Here's yesterdays menu:

I made a wet mop BBQ suauce out of ketchup, Worcestershire, molasses, cider vinegar, tabasco, honey, onion powder, garlic, and a littlle liquid smoke.

I quartered and skinned a 5 pound chicken and marinated it in some of the BBQ sauce for about two hours.

Next item was Italian Baked beans. Cannellini beans, pancetta, tomato sauce, dark beer, dijon mustard, sauteed onion and garlic. Baked at 400 for 45 minutes. If you want the recipe, let me know.

Finally some ears of sweet corn sprayed with olive oil and sprinkled with tabasco wrapped in foil baked on the top rack of the grill for about 45 minutes (indirect heat).

I grilled the chicken on high heat for about eight minutes per side and then finished them on the top rack of the grill on low heat (about 375) for 35 minutes.

Very good!

The sauce sounds great; but I think I would use my favoritie San Luis (Potosi) instead of Tabasco sauce

http://www.hotsauceblog.com/hotsaucearchiv...lavor%E2%80%9D/

I like the blended flavor of multiple peppers and the added garlic makes it wonderful.

Ingredients.

Acetic acid, Cascabel peppers, Arbol peppers, spices, natural flavors, preservatives (potassium sorbate, sodium benzoate), Ancho peppers, Guar gum, Yellow 5, Red 40, garlic powder.

Wish I had seen your recipe for Italian Baked beans before I used my last four cans of Cannellini beans making "white bean chile" with pork (Country ribs) and smoked hatch chilis

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OK. Here's yesterdays menu:

I made a wet mop BBQ suauce out of ketchup, Worcestershire, molasses, cider vinegar, tabasco, honey, onion powder, garlic, and a littlle liquid smoke.

I quartered and skinned a 5 pound chicken and marinated it in some of the BBQ sauce for about two hours.

Next item was Italian Baked beans. Cannellini beans, pancetta, tomato sauce, dark beer, dijon mustard, sauteed onion and garlic. Baked at 400 for 45 minutes. If you want the recipe, let me know.

Finally some ears of sweet corn sprayed with olive oil and sprinkled with tabasco wrapped in foil baked on the top rack of the grill for about 45 minutes (indirect heat).

I grilled the chicken on high heat for about eight minutes per side and then finished them on the top rack of the grill on low heat (about 375) for 35 minutes.

Very good!

The sauce sounds great; but I think I would use my favoritie San Luis (Potosi) instead of Tabasco sauce

http://www.hotsauceblog.com/hotsaucearchiv...lavor%E2%80%9D/

I like the blended flavor of multiple peppers and the added garlic makes it wonderful.

Ingredients.

Acetic acid, Cascabel peppers, Arbol peppers, spices, natural flavors, preservatives (potassium sorbate, sodium benzoate), Ancho peppers, Guar gum, Yellow 5, Red 40, garlic powder.

Wish I had seen your recipe for Italian Baked beans before I used my last four cans of Cannellini beans making "white bean chile" with pork (Country ribs) and smoked hatch chilis

Actually I used a Trader Joe's hot sauce. I'm just used to calling it Tabasco. Your's looks good too!

Here's the recipe from Giada De Laurentiis

Italian-Style Baked Beans

6 ounces thinly sliced pancetta, chopped ( Joe's note: A good quality bacon works well as a substitute if you can't find Pancetta)

2 onions, chopped

4 garlic cloves, minced

1 cup dark beer

1 cup tomato sauce

1/3 cup dark brown sugar

1/4 cup balsamic vinegar

3 tablespoons mild-flavored molasses

6 teaspoons Dijon mustard

3/4 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

4 (15-ounce) cans cannellini beans, drained

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F.

Cook the pancetta in a heavy large oven-safe pot over medium heat until crisp, about 8 minutes. Add the onions and garlic, and saute until the onions are translucent, about 5 minutes. Mix in the beer, tomato sauce, brown sugar, vinegar, molasses, mustard, salt, and pepper. Stir in the beans. Bring to a simmer. Transfer to the oven and bake, uncovered, until the bean mixture bubbles and thickens slightly, stirring occasionally, about 45 minutes.

I've made this many times. :thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup:

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Ahh Giada, I thought she had a really massive head until I saw how petite she really is. When they first had the barefoot contessa , I expected it to be her not Ina Garten. I like to catch Everyday Italian.

Hmm I have two Sara Lee Black Forest Hams (about six pounds each) deli style and a slicer.

I bet that shaved they would work out.

Not to mention that my favorite package store has imported German Dunkel (Warsteiner http://www.warsteiner-usa.com/) for $10 a twelve pack (well they have the other varieties as well, but hey dunkel is what real beer is all about).

We go through so much garlic I buy it in bulk at Sam's Club either the refrigerated whole clove or the minced in olive oil.

Got everything else on the list but the Cannellini beans but that is not a big deal. I can get the dried ones two pounds for a dollar. Maybe adapt that recipe to the slow cooker. (Hmm, just realized I have dried navy beans and great northerns in the pantry. Improvisation time.)

Edited by Pete_C

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Anyone got any suggestions for Beef Sweetbreads (Ris de Veau => Thymus ) ?

Other than the standard of thin sliced dusted in flour and fried in butter like scallopini?

The little grocery down the street from my house has them on for $1.28 a pound this week. They look good quality.

I probably will just google around and see if I can find any good recipes ; although the OL likes the scallopini idea.

Still, I would like to know if anyone has any favorite uses for them

Also suggested was grilled, but hey floured and fried in butter does sound good.

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