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mikex

Anyone Know Hvac Or Refridgeration

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All of a sudden my fridge is icing up. It is set up to blow cold air from the freezer to the fridge. The cooling coils in the freezerice over so no air circulates thus everything starts warming. Any one have ideas?

M

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Check to see if there is anything blocking the fan. Is the fan running? Check to see if the fan needs cleaning.

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Some interesting reading material.:::::

Poor cooling is often the result of a heavy frost build-up on the evaporator coils or a condenser that is clogged with dust, lint, and dirt.

Evaporator coils

Poor cooling is often the result of a heavy frost build-up on the evaporator coils. You can't see these coils without removing a panel on the inside of your freezer. A sure sign that there is a build-up is the presence of any frost or ice build-up on the inside walls, floor, or ceiling of the freezer. Such a frost build-up usually indicates a problem in the self-defrosting system or damaged door gaskets.

The refrigerator is supposed to self-defrost approximately four times in every 24 hour period. If one of the components in the self-defrosting system fails, the refrigerator continues to try to cool. Eventually, though, so much frost builds up on the evaporator coils that the circulating fan can't draw air over the coils. There may still be a small amount of cooling because the coils are icy, but with no air flow over the coils, cooling in the refrigerator compartment is quite limited.

Here's an inexpensive, though inconvenient, way to determine if the problem is with the self-defrosting system. Remove all of the perishable food from the refrigerator and freezer, turn the thermostat in the refrigerator to Off, and leave the doors open for 24 to 48 hours. (Be sure to have several towels ready in case the melting frost and ice causes the drip pan to overflow). This allows the refrigerator to defrost "manually." When the frost and ice build-up has completely melted away, turn the thermostat back to a normal setting. If the refrigerator then cools properly, it indicates a problem with one of three components in the self-defrosting system:

The defrost timer

The defrost thermostat (also called the bi-metal switch)

The defrost heater

If it still does not cool properly, there may be a problem with the refrigerant level or the compressor. You may need to consult with a qualified appliance repair technician to further diagnose the problem

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That's how my one of my refrigerators freezer has been for the last 6 years. I manually defrost it once a year. I learned that it doesn't build up as much by placing liter jugs of water in the freezer to fill up empty spaces.

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It is a side by side set up. freezer stays mostly full.

I defrosted the freezer with a blow drier, wiped the moisture from the interior. I checked the coils under the unit, there is some dust but I would say it is about 80% dust free. I turned the thermostat back back just a bit from what it was.

I have a thermometer in the fridge side watching it close....

M

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Check your drain plug in the freezer.

Make sure it's not block.

Algae will stop the water from dripping out.

I use an ice pick and some warm water to clear it.

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My best guess is it's one or a combination of: Defective defrost mechanism (fan, which you've checked, timer, heater) and a failure in the door gasket (allowing moisture to continuously enter).

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will check it out more tonight after work.

handplane the drain works all the water is collected near the compressor. I seen it.

The OL just says get a new one. But she also wants to do some major renovating in the house as well.

M

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New ones generally use like half the electricity of old ones so you eventually recoup the cost of replacement (I don't remember exactly but it could be like ten dollars a month less for electricity, quite noticeable) plus, they're generally quieter.

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We just replaced the Defrost timer in ours. Last time it broke, it was in the off mode and caused the coils to frost over and the temps to go way up. This time it broke in the on mode and it left the defroster running all the time... Fridge kept working hard to keep the temps down. Easy fix, $50 and a few screws with a plug in harness.

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All good advice there, Mike.

Now, as far as if you're (Ok, your wife, but that means the both of you, right??) thinking about just getting new--first of all, how old is the current fridge? Jdoors is right about the newer fridges using less power--when we "upgraded" from our 30 year old fridge, our electric bills went down $15 month, so do the math and in time it will pay for itself. But if the fridge is only "single digits old", you probably won't get the electricity savings, making the repair a better solution.

Liz

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AH! Refridgeration!

I've been without AC for a week now. In Phoenix. More on that in another post.

As far as your refrigerator goes, take off the bottom grate (the one near to the floor.)

The coils that are down there collect a whole lot of dirt and dust which significantlly restricts the cooling.

Try to clean them out with a soft brush/ broom and vacuum.

Be careful not to damage them.

That might help.

Joe

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