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Honda_Boy

Need Help Installing Stuff

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I built a "new" computer for church (only motherboard is new) and all I had to install on it was Fedora Core 4. Well now I want to install the newest version of Firefox. It's in a .tar.gz file. I can open it but I can't seem to find instructions anywhere on how to actually install it. I'm used to just double clicking an .exe and pushing next a few times. Never really could quite figure out installing stuff in Linux. Once I figured something out. It was an .rpm that acted just like an .exe but it only worked in gnome but I normally use KDE.

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go to a command prompt (bash shell) and move the tar.gz file to where you woudl like to open it up

to open the file (its like a zip file)

tar -zxvf firefox-2.0.0.1.tar.gz

(change to the directory it created)

cd firefox

type

run-mozilla.sh (note this is your install program.)

it should ask some questions.

another way

double click the file it should leave you with a firefox-2.0.0.1.tar

double click that and it should open the file up

double click run-mozilla.sh

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umm double clicking the the .sh file opened something but it didn't seem to do anything. Just a bunch of commands everywhere that appear to have accomplished nothing. Do I have to extract the stuff or something?

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umm double clicking the the .sh file opened something but it didn't seem to do anything. Just a bunch of commands everywhere that appear to have accomplished nothing. Do I have to extract the stuff or something?

in that case the file is not executable, doing a chmod +x filename would make it executable or right click and change its permissions checking the x,

I'll test it in Vmware in a min, I'm going from memory

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ok , I was wrong, there is a file firefox, that is firefox, just untar this where you want it and set up the short cut,

I am better on the command line so I can only give directions with that way, as there are too many GUI things that each Linux distro does differently.

but first lets make your system up2date using the red hat icon at the bottom and update the system.

open a command prompt and assume the root role.

coammd to type

yum -y install firefox

then see this site to get the plugins

http://www.gagme.com/greg/linux/fc4-tips.php

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to be quite honest, I think I'm gonna dump FC4 and put Windows 98SE on this thing if I can find the disc or XP if I can get a hold of another license. I jumped into an OS too quickly. I think I need to sit down and take a class to use it. I have less trouble using a Mac.

Why does it have to be so hard? Can't people just frickin write a program that installs like in Windows? I wanna like Linux but the simplicity of Windows (the use of it, not the make up. I know windows is ridiculously complex.) just makes me not wanna use Linux. I've got my machines all XP Home SP2 protected with all the necessary stuff and haven't had a lick of trouble out of any of them. It just makes learning to use Linux even harder cause I go "Hey, why frickin do this on this Linux box when I can just move over here 4 feet and use my Windows machine that I know how to use."

I'm not gonna worry about it. Sorry for bugging anyone. I'm too hard headed and I have ADD to boot (clinically diagnosed, I'm not kidding) so it just ain't gonna happen. If there is an easier version of Linux to use that acts more like Windows then please tell me cause I'd still like to learn but my patience is just too short to learn on this crap.

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Why does it have to be so hard? Can't people just frickin write a program that installs like in Windows?

They did. Normally you would either use the package manager (yum? I don't use Fedora) to automagically fetch and install the package, or download the package (in RPM format for Fedora) manually and (if GNOME is properly configured) install it with a double-click.

Example: to install Firefox in Ubuntu I would select Add/Remove... from the Applications menu to open the package installer, select the Internet category (or search), tick the checkbox by Firefox, and hit Apply. Add/Remove would download the package and install it. Simple as that.

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Further to iccaros's and jcl's excellent help. Using Linux and learning will require a bit of command line experience. Here is a good site that'll teach you about the command line:

linuxcommand.org

As jcl said Ubuntu is an excellent distro to start out with as the installation functions are handled for you. All you need is one CD to install Ubuntu. You can order one for free. See my pinned topic, getting Linux CDs at the top of this forum.

Linux can be very frustrating in the beginning. I think it is worth the effort. :D

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Another possibility would be to stick with what you know. You could upgrade your unit to Fedora Core 6. As I understand it the good people at Fedora have discontinued support for Fedora Core 4; they're not providing update support anymore.

You could also try Mandriva. Mandriva One is a single install CD that is very easy to use. Mandriva is based on redhat/fedora so you'll be familiar with the rpm install routine.

As I mentioned before you can check out my posted link up above on how to get these CDs or you can download them yourself. I have some useful links in my signature. "My Linux Stuff"

Have fun:-)

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Using Linux and learning will require a bit of command line experience.

That may have been true a little while back but I hardly think it "requires" it nowadays.

Especially using (K)Ubuntu and most other distros that provide a package manager.

I did the same thing by jumping in and thought I was over my head a bit when I first started with linux....Some of the lacking hardware support 'forced' me into command line situations (which in hindsight was a good thing) but given the improved state of hardware support in linux, I think you could get by with very minimal command line knowledge and still make good use of the OS...Not to say that use couldn't get more efficient with CLI knowledge though.

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Using Linux and learning will require a bit of command line experience.

That may have been true a little while back but I hardly think it "requires" it nowadays.

It does for the original poster as he's trying to install a tar.gz file. If he becomes more familiar with navigating around his hard drive from a shell prompt he can get more difficult things done.

However, yes, you can accomplish most things these days in Linux without a lot of command line knowledge.

I think Ubuntu or Mandriva would be a good choice as most things can be handled with a graphical interface. The install routine for Ubuntu 6.10 is very nice, just point and click, select next.

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ok so I'll ditch Fedora Core all together and give Ubuntu a whack sometime. All I know is Fedora Core 4 has been an extreme PITA to use. I still don't know what possessed me to ever download it. I shoulda gotten Ubuntu or whatever from the get go.

First I gotta wait for some bandwidth to free up. As some of you may know, I've become an anime freak so I'm constantly downloading anime. I may just go to church and download it since we have a 4Mbps connection there while I only have a 640Kbps.

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ok so I'll ditch Fedora Core all together and give Ubuntu a whack sometime. All I know is Fedora Core 4 has been an extreme PITA to use. I still don't know what possessed me to ever download it. I shoulda gotten Ubuntu or whatever from the get go.

First I gotta wait for some bandwidth to free up. As some of you may know, I've become an anime freak so I'm constantly downloading anime. I may just go to church and download it since we have a 4Mbps connection there while I only have a 640Kbps.

I shoulden't help new people to linux as I just confuse them, but one thing to remember that Fedora is the Test version of Linux. While its very usable as a desktop its more server ordinated and with Trusted Linux extensions added, it is one of the most secure OS out their, but that makes it a little more difficult as you must do different things. Ubuntu is made for newer users and you can ask them to mail you CD's for free.

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ok.

Now I notice there is both Ubuntu and Kubuntu made by the same people. What's the difference and which is easier to deal with?

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ok.

Now I notice there is both Ubuntu and Kubuntu made by the same people. What's the difference and which is easier to deal with?

Ubuntu is based on Gnome and Kubuntu is based on KDE. They are both very similar, easy to use, and set-up.

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Kubuntu it is then. I like KDE a lot more.

Okay. Sounds good. The latest version of Kubuntu 6.10 has a good package manager called Adept. What system specs does your unit have? Amount of RAM? Processor speed? Size of hard drive?

If your computer is at least a Plll with 256 MB RAM and a 10 GB HD you should be fine.

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It's a computer that people are gonna have access to that aren't skilled in Linux so it's gonna have Windows on it eventually. I wanna play around with Kubuntu some though and maybe install Kubuntu on another system (replacing Windows Vista Beta 2).

The specs of the church PC are:

AMD Duron 1600+

256MB PC2100 RAM

40GB Seagate HDD

PCI GeForce 4 MX420 64MB DDR

it can easily run pretty much any OS other than Vista. I had FC4 and FC5 before on a 800MHz PIII with 512MB of PC133 RAM and an AGP GeForce2 MX400. I even had it on a 600MHz PIII with 384MB of PC133 and an AGP GeForce2 MX200.

My systems that I'll be running it on will be:

The Compaq:

AMD Athlon XP 2600+

1GB PC3200 RAM (only operates at PC2100 due to chipset limitations)

80GB HDD with 20GB Secondary (will go on secondary)

AGP GeForce 6600GT 128MB DDR3

The Xplorer:

AMD Athlon 64 3500+

1GB PC3200 RAM Dual Channel

160GB HDD with 80GB Secondary but I will probably grab a spare 20GB to put it on.

2x PCI-Express GeForce 7600GT's operating in SLI.

So everything that Kubuntu will find it's way on will definitely have the power to run it.

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