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Phil

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About Phil

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  1. Solid State Drives

    I have a 32GB OCZ SSD in my desktop machine as the Windows boot disk. Is incredibly fast but was very expensive. Good performance, if you can afford them and, due to the lack of moving parts, it makes them good for laptops which are prone to being dropped. Phil
  2. Fiber Optic San?

    There's 2 main architectures you can consider. SAN and NAS. SAN being a mapping of remote storage such that it appears locally (for example ATA over Ethernet) and NAS being a mapping of remote storage such that it is still defined as remote (e.g. SMB). There's 2 main issues. Storage and throughput. The storage requirements are pretty massive and you'd need to carefully consider how it is accessed. That is to say how traffic much each server in the storage array will be transferring at one time. From this, you can decide on the mediums to use (whether that be for 1GigE or 10GigE Ethernet). If it is more than 10GigE, you would need to look at agregating links with something like IEEE802.1AD. Without any more details on users, load distribution etc., it's hard to advise any more. Phil
  3. Linux Connection Sharing With Belkin Router

    The question now is, how do you want it set up. Is it important that each individual device is on and accessible from the college network or do you just want to access files and resources on said network? Phil
  4. Linux Connection Sharing With Belkin Router

    Where does the belkin wireless adaptor connect to? Phil
  5. Admin Password For Vista

    Offline password and registry editor (http://home.eunet.no/pnordahl/ntpasswd/) will remove/change it. I've never had luck with changing it but it removes the password quite effectively. Just remove it, do your repair work and, when you can boot back into Windows, you can put a new password back on the account. Phil
  6. Router Question

    By 'recognise', I assume you mean be able to connect to the router and use it via wireless. If that is the case then they won't have any problems. Phil
  7. Fedora 9 Released

    I have a firm hatred of anything based on RedHat but I may check it out if I find some time. Thanks for the info Phil
  8. That's probably something you should ask Charter - however there were a fair few changes in Vista's SSL and TLS support which may have had an effect on the situation. Phil
  9. Keystroke Logger......

    Furthermore, why does he want a "stealth" keylogger. If it was to spy on someone legitimately (still wrong but slightly less so), why does it matter if it's covert or not? The best deterrent is known presence. Again, I question your motives and moral values. Phil
  10. Keystroke Logger......

    It was not an "insult", but a mere suggestion. To have someone spy on me would be a gross invasion of my privacy and take no end of measures to prevent that. I therefore feel it is morally wrong to spy on anyone else whether or not they be your own family. Phil
  11. Keystroke Logger......

    Yeh, there's a good one *Removed Rickrolling link. P.S. Go acquire some moral values. Phil
  12. If you add an imap account to most mail clients you should be able to drag and drop mails into the folders. Outlook definately supports this and I'd be surprised if Thunderbird/OE/Windows Live Mail etc. don't do it. Phil
  13. You'd be better investing your time in learning how to make sites without such wysiwyg tools. They all have their limitations and you can produce better sites without them. Phil
  14. Blog Spam

    The joys of inadequate protection. Phil
  15. Wireless & Security

    Because the source address of the packets is rewritten by the NAT software on the router as packets pass through destined for the WAN side of it there is no way for anyone on the WAN side of the router (i.e. the "authorities") to trace the cause of the downloading. All they see is the WAN IP and Mac address of the router. My university requires you to register your laptop and login to use the network. This means that they have your mac address on file and most likely log connections. All web traffic /should/ be through the university proxy and every request to that is logged. For a home user, their router (if it is any good) should list the Mac addresses of devices connected to it. Because the Mac address is unique per device it is technically possible to track down the offender. However, keep in mind that it is very easy to spoof a Mac address. I am also sceptical if the "authorities" would give the proverbial rats bottom about someone using your network whether it's protected or not. If you're going to use a wireless network, make it secure. Definately use the most up to date encryption standard availiable at the time (currently WPA2), use Mac address filtering on top of that for a tiny bit of added security (not much) and DON'T turn SSID broadcast off on the router. This is more dangerous than keeping it on. Phil